On Living Alone–Part Two

I was pointed to an interesting article yesterday. The original article, from the New York Times, was modestly titled “One is the Quirkiest Number – The freedom, and perils, of living alone.” Of course, Gawker got right to the point, declaring “NYT reports that living alone makes you behave like an insane person.” Now, a couple months back, I wrote a post about my experience living alone for the first time, which has truly been an overall positive experience. After reading the NYT article, a friend suggested I write a counter-piece – so here we go.

First, to Gawker’s point, “insane” is a bit much. Here are the examples they give from the NYT article. None are terribly insane. A little odd maybe. And some are downright normal.

  • Running in place during TV commercials (a bit strange, but if I had an elliptical in front of my TV, I’d totally do that. Well, I’d say I did anyway. But would probably just hang my bra on it (see below))
  • Talking in conversational French to themselves (I’ve been known to talk to myself in Spanish. Just because I can)
  • Talking to their cats (Ok, here’s the thing. Cats have ears. That means they can hear. Which means talking to them is not strange. It is perfectly normal to talk to anything with ears. Now, you start talking to your sofa, then we have problems)
  • Using their dryers as dressers (I can’t judge. I’ve had my laundry basket full of clean clothes in my living room for a week. I’ve pulled all my undies from it this week – no clean ones in the drawers. You may call this lazy. I say to you with roommates/significant others: you’re just jealous!)
  • Leaving their bras on the kitchen counter (Hmm… I don’t clean my counters enough to agree with this. But the coffee table, couch, recliner, floor, night stand…)
  • Wearing special “home alone” outfits, such as “white flax bloomers that go down to my knee” (Ok, I don’t dress any different alone than when I was married. Am I wrong in thinking it’s normal for married people to hang around their houses in sweats and junky shirts? That’s why you get married – to not have to dress up anymore. What I enjoy most about living alone is that I can run around the house without clothes and not have to worry that I’m giving anyone “ideas” or having someone think I’m in the mood for “that” rather than just not being in the mood to wear clothes.)
  • Subsisting “largely on cereal” (Depends on the type. Lucky Charms? Crunch Berries? Or Bran Flakes?)
  • “Grazing” on “nuts and seeds” (Or Sour Patch Kids and Good N Plenty’s. Potato. Potahto.) Continue reading

Confidence! The single girl traveler’s best defense

As a single person, traveling alone becomes inevitable. When the choice is to stay home, or to explore the world, I hope everyone chooses to explore! But traveling alone is a bit of a scary prospect.

Recently I went on a business trip to NYC. I had never visited the Big Apple, so I decided to go a couple days early to explore the city. I had never taken a vacation on my own before and was more nervous than I’d hoped I would be. I think of myself as a very independent girl. I am strong and tough and confident. But I was still so nervous. I talked with a single girlfriend of mine who encouraged me to just go for it. Her advice was perfect – in all situations, show confidence!  I was determined not to let my trepidation get the best of me, so, being a planner by nature, I figured out the things I most wanted to do and see while I was there. It’s easier to be confident when you have a plan.

In the cab on the way from the airport, I gave myself a good pep talk. I have to admit, seeing downtown NYC from across the Hudson brought up excitement and extreme nervousness. The entire drive over, I followed our path on my phone’s mapping application and planned out what to do first. I discovered Carnegie Deli was a block away. Continue reading

An Introduction to the Modern Homemaker: Single Edition

This blog is dedicated to my mother and all the other strong women of the world

Growing up, we had an old fashioned family – my mom stayed home and my dad provided for the family. But when it came to home repairs and such, they were both involved equally. My dad designed the plans for our house, and I watched my parents build our home when I was just five years old. My mom worked right alongside him, even operating a chainsaw and the power tools. To me, it seemed normal to have a mom who could do just about everything my dad could.

baby

Despite that show of strength, I guess I mostly just saw the partnership of it. I still had this thought that life started once I got married and I had someone to work alongside. My parents had married really young, and I assumed I would to. I kept waiting. And waiting. I finally got married at 30 years old. I was so excited that we had our own house that we could fix up together. But I soon found that he was really no good at home projects. He didn’t enjoy it or seem to have any interest in it. It seemed so unfathomable to me that a man could have no desire to take care of a home, or even to learn how. I quickly realized I was perfectly capable on my own. Why did I need someone else to do the manual labor for me? Why had I waited so long to do all these things that I really enjoyed doing? Four years later, and for a variety of additional reasons, I am now a single girl, managing my household. And loving it!

And you can, too. I hope to share with you what I’ve learned. You can take care of yourself and your household – whether you live in a house or apartment. I don’t claim to know everything, but I’ve learned a few tricks I can share. And I would love to hear any tips you may have along the way.